City of Paso Robles Completes New Tertiary Treatment Facilities at Wastewater Treatment Plant

By on November 7, 2019

The city of Paso Robles recently celebrated the completion of one of the largest and most complex infrastructure projects in the city’s history. A ribbon-cutting ceremony and facility tours were held to mark the opening of the new Tertiary Treatment Facilities at the city’s Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Paso Robles, with a population of almost 30,000 and covering 19.9 square miles, has a master plan to produce high quality recycled water and distribute it to east Paso Robles, where it will be safely used for irrigation of city parks, golf courses, and vineyards. Utilizing the treated water will reduce the need to pump groundwater from the Paso Robles Groundwater Basin and further improve sustainability of the city’s water supply. The new Tertiary Treatment Facilities project fulfills the first part of the city’s master plan master plan.

The Tertiary Treatment Facilities project (TTFP) included flow equalization, cloth filtration, ultraviolet light disinfection, a recycled water storage pond and pump station, and a state-of-the-art nutrient harvesting system. The second part of the recycled water master plan is a major pipeline project called the Recycled Water Distribution System.  That project is currently in design and will be ready for construction in 2020.

The ribbon-cutting event included city officials, Assemblyman Jordan Cunningham (R-35th District- San Luis Obispo) and other interested persons. City staff thanked those who contributed to the project, including engineering firm Black & Veatch, Assemb. Cunningham, Cushman Contracting Corporation, SWCA Environmental, construction manager Steve Wrightson, and city treatment plant staff.

Paso Robles’ Project Manager Matt Thompson said, “Paso Robles has a long history of determined people working together to meet important needs.  I’m proud to be a part of another example of that.  We are thankful for what previous generations have contributed to this community. Our children will someday be thankful for what we have accomplished here.”

The Tertiary Treatment Facilities project included flow equalization, cloth filtration, ultraviolet light disinfection, a recycled water storage pond and pump station, and a state-of-the-art nutrient harvesting system (see figure below).  The City completed the project for $14.4 million, which is $2.8 million under budget.

The city was able to finance the TTFP through the state’s low interest revolving fund loan program. With the TTFP’s many environmentally innovative features, the state’s financing included a $4 million grant.