LADWP expands water conservation rebates

LADWP expands water conservation rebates

As drought continues it’s grip on California, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is offering residential customers a reward for conserving water by increasing rebates to 25% for high-efficiency clothes washers to $500, and increasing rebates for water-efficient toilets by 65% to $250. Business customers can receive a $300 rebate for low-flush toilets increased from $250.

LADWP says customers can take advantage of the increased rebates now and will translate into ongoing, monthly bill savings for customers who take advantage of replacing their less efficient appliances and fixtures.

“As all of California faces extremely dry conditions for a third year in a row, we are urgently calling for Angelenos to conserve and use water efficiently. Offering our customers higher-dollar rebates and other resources means they are able to continue saving water while also lowering their utility bill,” said Martin Adams, LADWP General Manager and Chief Engineer. “The less water used now means more water stored up for when it’s needed most in the later spring and summer months.”

LADWP continues to offer a wide array of rebates and incentive programs that encourage water use efficiency for residents and businesses, including: a $3-per-square-foot turf replacement rebate for residential and business customers; free design services for turf replacement projects; free turf removal workshops where customers learn how to transform their landscape to a beautiful, drought tolerant one; giveaways of free water conserving faucet aerators and showerheads; and generous rebates on landscaping devices like rotating sprinkler nozzles and weather-based irrigation controllers.

LADWP residential customers interested in learning more or to take advantage of the programs, visit www.ladwp.com/save. For LADWP’s commercial rebate programs, visit www.ladwp.com/cwr.

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