Metropolitan Water District Makes Turf Removal Easier with Step-By-Step Video Tutorials

By on July 9, 2019

Never more so than during the hot summer days are Southern Californians more aware of the cost of outdoor watering. As the mercury on the thermometer climbs so do the totals on water bills. But Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of Southern California is making it easier to remove your lawns and do it yourself.

MWD has just launched a series of step-by-step, animated video tutorials to walk people through the process of removing grass and laying the groundwork for beautiful and more sustainable yards. The four to six minutes videos help residents determine the method they want to use in removing their lawns. Videos on sheet mulching, solarization and sod removal allow residents to determine their grass type as well the length of time and tools needed to perform the work.

“There are so many reasons to get rid of your grass – beautifying your yard, conserving water, saving money, and helping Southern California respond to a changing climate,” said MWD’s Water Efficiency Manager Bill McDonnell. “We want to make sure we’re helping residents as much as possible so they can successfully remove their lawn, navigate the rebate process and see the results they want.”

Residents and businesses in MWD’s 5,200-square-mile service area can still access the water agency’s $2-persquare-foot turf replacement rebate (up to $10,000 in rebates.) The first step to claiming a rebate is to click on the http://socalwatersmart.com/en/residential/rebates/available-rebates/turf-replacement-program/ link for the turf replacement program overview. This overview discusses the programs aim to combine turf removal, irrigation modification and rainwater retention or filtration to support reuse or soil absorption of rainwater.

The http://bewaterwise.com/ link details the application process and the rebate specifics. Some water agencies in parts of MWD’s footprint may offer additional rebates on devices such as weather-based irrigation controllers, soil moisture sensors, rotating nozzles, rain barrels or cisterns. The http://bewaterwise.com/ website also offers additional how-to information on California native gardening guides, a schedule of turf replacement and landscape training classes as well as numerous videos.

Fall is the optimal season to plant a California native garden so removing your turf this summer is a timely decision. By next summer your yard will be blooming with California native plants and your decreased water bill will be an asset to your budget.